Director

Prof. Anya Jones
Originally from New Orleans, LA, Prof. Jones has been a member of the Aerospace Engineering faculty at the University of Maryland since 2010. She earned her Ph.D. in experimental aerodynamics from the University of Cambridge, her S.M. from MIT in Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a dual B.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering. In addition to running her lab, she teaches a graduate course in unsteady aerodynamics and an undergraduate course in incompressible aerodynamics. Prof. Jones has been awarded the AFOSR Young Investigator Award (2012), NSF CAREER Award (2016), and the PECASE from the White House (2016). In 2017 she was awarded a Fulbright Scholar Award to the Technion in Haifa, Israel (2017-2018) and an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship to TU Braunschweig in Germany (2018). She is currently chair of a NATO Research Technology Organization task group on gust response and unsteady aerodynamics, an associate fellow of AIAA, and a member of the Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center, University of Maryland Energy Research Center, Maryland Robotics Center, and faculty advisor to the UMD Women in Aeronautics and Astronautics.

PhD Students

Hülya Biler
Hülya was born and raised in Antalya, Turkey. Her interest in aeronautics started in high school. The thing that attracted her the most to aeronautics was nature itself. She moved to Istanbul to study Aeronautical Engineering at Istanbul Technical University where she completed her undergraduate study, and received a Fulbright scholarship to complete her M.S. at Maryland. She is interested in flapping wing applications, gust studies, and low Reynolds number flows. Along with her scientific work, she enjoys swimming, abstract art, and chess.

Antonios Gementzopoulos
Antonios was born in a small city in northern Greece and moved to Brooklyn, New York at a young age. He earned his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from New York University and M.Res. in Aeronautical Engineering from the University of Cambridge. As an undergraduate researcher, he studied causal relationships in fish schools as part of a project to develop biomimetic underwater robots. During his time in Cambridge, he worked closely with Rolls-Royce to develop software that can aid in the prediction of combustion instabilities in aircraft engines. He is currently interested in the aerodynamics challenges facing the next generation of aircraft such as the prediction and control of gust encounters as well as the transition between vertical and horizontal flight in urban environments. Antonios enjoys exploring nature, playing chess, and can often be found biking to the office but never without a helmet.

Jonathan Lefebvre
Jonathan was born in Huntsville, Alabama and grew up in Bethesda, Maryland. At the age of fifteen, he enjoyed his first flight experience in a Waco YMF5 cementing his desire to study aerospace engineering. Jonathan first joined the lab during his senior year as an undergraduate at the University of Maryland in 2012 researching airfoils in reverse flow. After completing his B.S. in 2013, he moved to France until 2016 during which he earned his M.S from ISAE-SUPAERO in Toulouse researching neuro-ergonomics and interned as a systems engineer at Airbus Helicopters near Marseille. Returning to UMD for a Ph.D., his research focuses on the shedding of ship-superstructure vortices on airfoils by performing wind tunnel experiments. Outside the lab, Jonathan enjoys flying, sailing, rock climbing, traveling, and meeting new people.

Girguis Sedky
Girguis was born in Cairo, Egypt, and raised in both Cairo and Abu Dhabi, UAE. He moved to the U.S. to continue his higher education. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering with a minor in Aerospace Engineering from LSU and then moved to the University of Maryland to pursue his Masters of Science in Aerospace Engineering. He took a special interest in research during his two years of work in LSU’s combustion lab as an undergraduate where he mainly focused his efforts on designing experimental devices and automating experiments. His specific interest in Aerodynamics developed through both his fluid mechanics coursework and his involvement in the LSU Hyperloop team as the Aerodynamics lead. He designed the aerodynamic shell of the vehicle and led its building effort. Outside of school, Girguis enjoys playing sports like squash and ping pong, jogging, traveling, and hiking.

Oliver Wild
Oliver was born in Zurich, Switzerland. From early on, he was fascinated by all sorts of aircraft and wanted to understand how they function aerodynamically. He studied mechanical engineering at ETH Zurich with a focus on aerospace engineering, where he received a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree. Oliver worked in several wind tunnels in Switzerland (ETH Zurich, RUAG Aviation), Germany (BMW Group), the UK (Loughborough University), and the US (Caltech) through internships, theses and research projects. He also gained teaching experience early on by instructing undergraduate students in the large subsonic wind tunnel of ETH Zurich for several semesters. His current research focuses on experimental reverse flow aerodynamics over rotorcraft blades carried out in multiple wind tunnel facilities at UMD. In addition to his aerodynamic research, Oliver enjoys gliding, piloting model aircraft, ski racing, and surfing.

MS Students

Alex Goldberg
Alex was born in Asheville, North Carolina and raised in New Jersey. At the age of seven he attended the Millville International Air Show and saw the Navy Blue Angels perform their aerobatics routine, kicking off a lifelong passion for aviation. He received his Bachelor’s of Science in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Rutgers University, where he undertook research to understand the aerodynamic behavior of F/A-18 Super Hornets during landing maneuvers on aircraft carriers. After graduation he held positions with both Boeing’s vertical lift division and Leonardo helicopters, focusing on rotor blade repair and remanufacture. His research interests are focused on understanding reverse flow effects at high advance ratios, and novel rotor blade design concepts. During his free time he is often cycling, hiking, or reading too much science fiction.

Undergraduates

Assaf Krupnik
Assaf was born and raised in the north of Israel. After completing his mandatory military service, he moved to Bethesda, MD and became a commercial pilot and flight instructor, fulfilling his childhood dream. Further fascinated by the mechanics of flight, Assaf came to UMD to pursue his Bachelor’s in aerospace engineering. He joined the lab as a sophomore and continues to explore wake-interference on multiple bodies while learning valuable lessons in experimental methods and unsteady flow. Outside of lab work, Assaf is working with a startup developing an unmanned organ delivery platform and enjoys flying, playing music, and hiking.

Lab Alumni

Luke Smith completed his Ph.D. in May of 2020 and accepted a position as an engineer in the Hydroacoustics and Propulsor Design branch of the Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Maryland.

Nicholas Zhu graduated in the spring of 2019 with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and moved to Daytona Beach, FL to begin graduate school at Embry-Riddle.

Zachary Smith completed his M.S. in May of 2018 and accepted a position as an engineer in helicopter dynamics at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) in Patuxent River, Maryland.

Phil Kirk completed his M.S. in May of 2018 and accepted a position as a flight test engineer at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) in Patuxent River, Maryland.

Mohamed Nassif graduated in the spring of 2018 with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and moved to Atlanta, GA to begin graduate school at Georgia Tech.

Field Manar completed his Ph.D. in January of 2018 and accepted a position as an engineer in the Hydroacoustics and Propulsor Design branch of the Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Maryland.

Peter Mancini completed his Ph.D. in the fall of 2017 and began working as a Research Analyst in Cyber Systems at The Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) in Alexandria, VA.

Gino Perrotta completed his Ph.D. in the fall of 2017 and moved to a postdoc position at The George Washington University in Washington, DC.

Andrew Lind completed his Ph.D. in 2015 and remained in the group as postdoc until 2017, when he began working as an Assistant Research Engineer at the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel.

Max Cassell graduated in the spring of 2016 with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and accepted a job at Toyon Research Corporation in Sterling, VA.

Ignacio Andreu graduated in the spring of 2016 with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and moved to Illinois continue his studies at the University of Illinois.

Hannah Spooner graduated in the spring of 2015 with her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and moved to Wichita, KS to work on airframe design for Cessna.

Ryan Joyce graduated in the spring of 2015 with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and remained on campus to begin graduate school in the fall.

Mateusz Gabryszuk graduated in the spring of 2015 with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and remained in the department to begin graduate school in the fall.

Krista Cratty graduated in the spring of 2015 with her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering and moved to College Station, TX to begin graduate school at Texas A&M in the Department of Aerospace Engineering.

Nate Beals graduated in the spring of 2014 with his M.S. in Aerospace Engineering, “The Effect of Passive Deformation on the Lift Produced by a Rotating Hinged Wing” and accepted a job at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen, MD.

Michael Madden graduated in the spring of 2014 with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from UMD. His departmental honors thesis was entitled “Interactions between a Model Turbine and the Seafloor.” He has since moved on to work at NAVAIR in Pax River, MD, performing flight tests on the F35 Joint Strike Fighter.

Kristy Schlueter completed her M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from UMD in 2013, entitled “Analysis of Factors Affecting the Aerodynamics of Low Reynolds Number Rotating Wings.” She was awarded the NDSEG Fellowship in 2013 and moved on to pursue a Ph.D. at Caltech.

Sarvesh Sethi was an undergraduate research assistant in 2013. He graduated with his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from UMD in the spring of 2014, and moved to Ann Arbor, MI to work for Vayu, a small company that designs and builds UAVs for healthcare supply chain management and post-disaster aid delivery.

Mark Glucksman-Glaser earned his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from UMD in 2010 and M.S. in 2013, entitled “Effects of Model Scaling on Sediment Transport in Brownout.” He moved on to work for ISSI, supporting NAVAIR at Pax River, MD.

Sid Kolluru completed his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering in 2010 from UMD and his M.S., entitled “Unsteady Low Reynolds Number Aerodynamics of a Rotating Wing,” in 2012. He moved on to work in experimental aerodynamics for Bell Helicopter in Ft. Worth, TX.

Baozhu Zhang was an undergraduate research assistant and a Women in Engineering Research Fellow in 2011-2012. She completed her M.S. in systems engineering at UMD in the spring of 2014, and then moved on to work at AAI as a systems engineer in Cockeysbille, MD.

Oscar Alvarado, an undergraduate research assistant in 2011, completed his M.S. in the AeroSmart lab in 2013.